Consonant sounds

In contrast to the open sounds of vowels, consonants are closed sounds. This means there is some type of obstruction to the airflow from the lungs by parts of the mouth coming into contact with each other (or very nearly contacting) and so closing off the free flow of air.

In English there are approximately 24 consonants and these are arranged into five main groups:

  1. Plosives: sounds that cannot be sustained and which have a 'popping' quality. For example: /p/ as in pea and /b/ as in boy.
  2. Nasals: sounds in which the escaping air passes through the nasal cavity. For example: /m/ as in map and /n/ as in nap.
  3. Fricatives: as air exits through the mouth, it forces its way through a narrowed gap to create turbulence or friction. For example: /s/ as in so and /f/ as in fit.
  4. Affricates: these are combination sounds that begin with a complete obstruction formed by the tongue tip contacting the alveolar ridge, before the air is released slowly with friction. For example: /ʧ/ as in chop and /ʤ/ as in jam.
  5. Approximants: a group of four sustainable sounds: /w/ as in we, /r/ as in red, /l/ as in let and /j/ as in you.

As well as the above five main groups, consonants can be further described in terms of their voicing, place of articulation and manner of articulation:

Voicing

Voicing refers to whether or not the vocal folds are vibrating during the production of the consonant. If they are not vibrating the sound is voiceless and if they are vibrating then the sound is voiced.

Place of articulation

This refers to the place in the vocal tract where the two articulators come together. There are eight places:

Place of articulation
  1. Bilabial: two lips come together.
  2. Labio-dental: lip and teeth come together.
  3. Dental: tongue contacts the teeth.
  4. Alveolar ridge: tongue tip moves towards the gum ridge just behind the upper incisors.
  5. Post alveolar: tongue tip is close to the position just behind the alveolar ridge, towards the back of the mouth.
  6. Palatal: tongue moves towards the roof of the mouth (palate).
  7. Velar: the back of the tongue moves towards the soft palate (velum).
  8. Glottal: the only glottal consonant in English is /h/ as in how. Strictly speaking, this does not involve two articulators coming together. The sound is simply the friction caused by air being expelled through the gap between the vocal cords (glottis).

Manner

This indicates the type of contact that is made between the two articulators and is defined simply by the five main groups described above: plosive, nasal, fricative, affricate or approximant.

The table below summarizes the 24 main consonants of English in terms of their voicing, place and manner. Click on the links to watch a short video of how each consonant is produced.

Phonetic symbol Example Manner Place of articulation Video
/p/ pot plosive bilabial How to pronounce the /p/ sound
/b/ bet plosive bilabial How to pronounce the /b/ sound
/d/ dog plosive alveolar How to pronounce the /d/ sound
/t/ top plosive alveolar How to pronounce the /t/ sound
/k/ kit plosive velar How to pronounce the /k/ sound
/g/ got plosive velar How to pronounce the /g/ sound
/f/ fog fricative labio-dental How to pronounce the /f/ sound
/v/ vat fricative labio-dental How to pronounce the /v/ sound
/ɵ/ thick fricative dental How to pronounce the /ɵ/ sound
/ð/ that fricative dental How to pronounce the /ð/ sound
/s/ sat fricative alveolar How to pronounce the /s/ sound
/z/ zoo fricative alveolar How to pronounce the /z/ sound
/ʃ/ shut fricative post-alveolar How to pronounce the /ʃ/ sound
/ʒ/ measure fricative post-alveolar How to pronounce the /ʒ/ sound
/h/ help fricative glottal How to pronounce the /h/ sound
/ʧ/ church affricate post-alveolar How to pronounce the /ʧ/ sound
/ʤ/ jump affricate post-alveolar How to pronounce the /ʤ/ sound
/m/ mom nasal bilabial How to pronounce the /m/ sound
/n/ nod nasal alveolar How to pronounce the /n/ sound
/ŋ/ thing nasal velar How to pronounce the /ŋ/ sound
/l/ lot approximant alveolar How to pronounce the /l/ sound
/r/ rat approximant post-alveolar How to pronounce the /r/ sound
/w/ won approximant bilabial How to pronounce the /w/ sound
/j/ you approximant palatal How to pronounce the /j/ sound